martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)
Due to unforeseen circumstances, the Creative Space website has now been removed. Apologies to all contributors, and please feel free to resubmit your rooms, descriptions and bios to the more professional version of the site, as run by somebody else. Sorry, I don't have the web page address for it, I'll chase it up and add it to the post later.

Thank you.

EDIT - ah, here it is:

http://www.theauthor.biz

As for why, I'll just say that I hate repetition and redundancy, and figure a single good site of this type is better than two ordinary ones. So I step aside in deference to the other. Entirely my own decision to let someone else do all the work instead of me.
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)


Well, the month-long experiment is over. We ended up with sixteen creative spaces from a variety of different people, with some very interesting ones included (like Kyla Ward's mirror room, and Damien Kane's mobile office!). Thanks so much to everyone here who contributed, it was a heap of fun to do, and there's now a website as promised containing them all. The URL is:

http://creativespace.martinlivings.com/

Cheers, and thanks again!

Martin
31-10-07
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Martin Livings





Welcome to my new writing space! We’ve only just moved into our our, so it’s all a little up-in-the-air for the moment still, but this will suffice for the time being. On my desk is my trusty notebook, which served as our one and only computer for the entirety of our year-long stay in the UK last year, and is still all I need for my purposes. The top two shelves of my bookshelf is mostly my “to read” pile, with a couple of my favourite non-fiction books added in for the hell of it. The bottom shelf is a bit of history, and contains my almost-complete collection of Eidolon magazines (I’m only missing 1, 2 and 4, from memory!), and some Aurealis as well, plus all my old Dowling and McMullen books from that era and other miscellanea. The magazine racks are stuffed full of mostly nineties horror magazines like Fangoria and Gorezone, perfect toilet reading material.

On the wall is the Alien head I brought back from the UK, bought at the Camden Stables Markets. It’s a miracle it survived the trip. I have to take it down and hide it when we have visitors, as the study is also the guest bedroom!

Not much writing has been done here yet, but NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, so I guess we’ll see if it works or not!

Martin Livings

Martin Livings is a Perth based writer of horror, science fiction and fantasy. His first novel, Carnies, was released in June 2006, was nominated for both the Ditmar and Aurealis awards, and won the Tin Duck award for long work from that year. His short works have been listed in the Recommended Reading list in Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror, and have appeared The Year's Best Australian SF & Fantasy, Volume Two and Australian Dark Fantasy & Horror: 2006 edition, as well as other publications such as Eidolon, Aurealis, Andromeda Spaceways In-Flight Magazine, and anthologies such as AustrAlien Absurdities, Daikaiju and Robots and Time. He has also edited for Eidolon magazine, and with Stephanie Gunn put together the online Horror Day Anthology in 2006. This Creative Space project is his latest frivolous venture.

Deep down, though, he’d rather be playing guitar in a rock and roll band. Go figure.

http://www.martinlivings.com
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Grant Watson





Ok, so this is the view of my creative process: I don't write too much on paper any more, except for vague story or scene ideas that I get while on public transport, the occassional snatch of good dialogue I'll think up. That sort of thing.

If I'm knee-deep in writing a script I have to have music filling the silence up, but it can't have lyrics that otherwise distract me, so hence the big collection of movie soundtracks above and to the right of the monitor. The speakers for my computer died recently, hence the old set of headphones next to the mouse.

Above the shelving unit is (in various locations):

- A Balinese monkey mask I got when I was seven years old. I have cautiously avoided asking what animal the fur on it comes from for my entire life.

- My wife's collection of different dolls from around the world from her childhood.

- The "Pigs in Space" set from The Muppet Show, currently piloted by Miss Piggy and an unfortunately designed X-Men Cyclops figure where if you press a button on his back he whips his arm up to his visor... unless you only half-bend the arm at the elbow, in which case he gives you the finger... unless you don't bend the arm at all, in which case he gives a Nazi salute. Disturbing.

- Lots of collectible figurines from those little Japanese toy
capsules: Disney princesses, Spider-Man and his enemies, Megaman, some Pokemon.

- A Dr Elefun statue in a little case.

- The collected cast of The Tick in plastic form.

- A six-piece photo frame set containing every surviving photo from my honeymoon. We took a camera with us that turned out to be broken, and these were the only images we managed to get out of it.

Making up the room behind me is a black couch that folds into a bed, a Ferris Bueller's Day Off lobby card, and two shelves filled primarily with play and film scripts.

Grant Watson

Grant Watson is a play, comic and television script writer. His plays include Degree Absolute and Serpentine, his comics include The Angriest Video Store Clerk in the World and Henry & Gil vs the Infinity Engine and his TV includes several failed projects that died before broadcast and something for the ABC he can't talk about yet.

http://angriest.livejournal.com
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Kyla Ward





THE LOOKING-GLASS DESK

"Let's pretend there's a way of getting through into it, somehow, Kitty. Let's pretend the glass has got all soft like gauze, so that we can get through. Why, it's turning into a sort of mist now, I declare! It'll be easy enough to get through - "

And here Alice saw all sorts of queer things tucked away. There was a mummy case, such as she had seen in the British Museum, and a glasses case that was nearly as big! There were cats and bats and gargoyles, some of which seemed quite alive and others which did not. A stone that looked very much like a spider gave her serious pause. "Am I quite sure," she said, "that it's not a spider that looks very much like a stone? I suppose it doesn't matter, so long as it doesn't move."

She walked an unlikely number of knife edges to discover not cards, but some small figures that might have been chess pieces and a number of strangely shaped dice. There were a great many books with pictures and conversations layered indiscriminately with dictionaries and a Latin grammar, which seemed much too much like school, and one book where the pictures appeared to be the conversation. There were pens and brushes and inks of all colours sitting about with candles, cups and plates, so it seemed like the ruins of a mad tea party. If this were a writing desk, the writer was certainly ravin' And very much larger than she. Perhaps if she took one of these hard black tablets, which were all that seemed to be left of the feast... Alas, the tablet tasted of nothing but data and Alice quite regretted taking such a byte.

And then Alice began seeing even stranger things, that were very disconcerting indeed. But that's another story. Several, in fact!

Kyla Ward

Kyla Ward is the co-author of the novel Prismatic, under the name Edwina Grey. She has had short fiction published in Shadowed Realms, Borderlands, Gothic.Net, Agog!, Agog! 2, Passing Strange and Aurealis. Her poetry has appeared in Bloodsongs and Abbadon. Her story 'The Feast' was given an honorable mention in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Thirteenth Annual Collection, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, and her poem 'Mary' was similarly honoured in the Eighth collection. Her story 'Kijin Tea' was nominated for both Aurealis and Ditmar awards for 2003.

http://www.tabula-rasa.info/KylaWard.html
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Nick Evans





A journalist's working space, complete with working journalist.

Nick Evans is a lazy bum who never responded to my request for a description and bio for his photo, so I did some research on Wikipedia instead.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Evans_%28disambiguation%29

Nick Evans is the name of several notable people:
  • Nick Evans (born 14 August 1980), a New Zealand rugby union footballer
  • Nick Evans (trombonist), a British jazz trombonist of e.g. The Keith Tippett Group, Soft Machine
  • Nick Evans (linguist), an Australian linguist specialising in Indigenous Australian languages.
I don’t think our Nick is any of these. Therefore he’s not a notable person. So why are we showing his photo here? I don’t know.

Oh, all right, fine, here you go...

Nick Evans is one of only a few journalists in Australia dedicated to the biotechnology field. Over the course of his career he has worked as a barman, a Research Officer to a politician, a Trade Union official, and as the Media Officer for a local government authority. He is not planning on giving up his day job. Most recently he co-edited The Workers Paradise for Ticonderoga Publications.

http://ticonderogaonline.org/publications/workersparadise.html
http://crankynick.livejournal.com
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Matthew Tait





Until reading King's On Writing, I had always dreamed of having a cathedral-like creative space... as much a mirror of the canvas of my skull as I could possibly make it. Then he reminded me that life isn't a support system for Art, but the other way around.

And so my little desk now sits in a corner, and my friends who stand on it are a permanent fixture (including a miniature Kurt Cobain to remind me of my musical roots), although some days they might be swapped around. What you can't see is still a room that is a testament to the human imagination. I collect movie memorabilia and have framed portraits of some of HR Giger's paintings. A talking Gollum and a life-sized Jason head from Friday the 13th are placed atop the works of fiction I've been adding since the age of nine. Things like these are only inspiration tools as I pad around, nothing more, and that's why the desk faces away from them. The only distractions I can tolerate when writing are from my small view and music from my speakers. The dicta-phone tucked away in the corner has come to play an integral part in the writing process for me.

Matthew Tait

Matthew Tait was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1977. Like many authors and artists he has held far too many for any man to admit to. These include working in kitchens and co-managing a video store to name just a few. And although it seems a pre-requisite for any writer, he's plays rhythm guitar in a few grunge bands as well.

Currently he is one of the associate editors of HorrorScope (the award winning Australian news and literary criticism zine dedicated to dark and speculative fiction). His latest novel is titled Different Masks. In 2006, his short story "Car Crash Weather" was shortlisted as a finalist for the Australian Horror Writers Association annual competition.

http://www.matthewtait.com/
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)
Hi all,

I'm starting to run out of photos for my Creative Space project. If anyone else is going to send me a photo, description and short bio, you'd better do it soon, because once I run out, that's it!

Email me at creativespace@martinlivings.com if you want your photo and description up here. It's been great thus far, and I'd hate it to die an early death (ie, before the end of October!).
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Cat Sparks





This photo of my study is a little false in that the room is much less messy than usual. My study contains a single bed and doubles as a guest room. Our most recent houseguest left this morning & everything has been nicely cleared and dusted.

I write on a 12 inch Mac notebook. It's small and light enough to fit into my bag, so sometimes it comes to work with me so I can write on the train and in a cafe or the park at lunchtime. I like writing on trains. I used to get a lot of wordage down when I commuted regularly between Sydney and Wollongong. These days I do most of my writing here at this desk. I should probably get myself a better chair. This one was picked up at a garage sale in Leichhardt seven years ago. It cost five bucks and I pushed it home to the share house I was living in at the time. It's ugly and not very ergonomic, but I never think of replacing it.

I keep a wad of A4 paper under my mouse. This is essential -- I need to scribble notes to myself when I'm writing. Electronic note taking doesn't work for me. Something about the neatness of computer screens and pixel-based lists is all wrong in the mid-story writing frenzy context. I hang on to my notepads when they become full, but I might as well not bother because most of my handscrawl is meaningless and indecipherable once the story is done. My note scribbling is like yoga. Its all about being in the moment.

The other computer you see in this picture is for graphic design. Its desk is littered with knick knacks, stationery, little bits of stuff. I need my stuff to be in visual range. If it’s cleared away in a drawer somewhere, I forget I have it. Beyond the red blinds, through the window lies the front garden. It's lush and green despite the drought & gives a peripheral impression of jungle, with its enormous rubber plants and palm fronds. Our street is quiet. This is an excellent spot for writing undisturbed.

Cat Sparks

Cat Sparks lives on the sunny south coast of New South Wales, Australia, where she works as a graphic designer and runs Agog! Press with her partner, author Robert Hood.

In 2004 she was a graduate of the inaugural Clarion South Writers' Workshop and an L Ron Hubbard's Writers of the Future prize winner. Since 2000 she has published forty+ stories and received eight Australian SF awards. She recently became a member of SFWA.

http://www.catsparks.net
http://catsparx.livejournal.com/
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Robert Hood





My "creative space" is smallish -- what you see here is pretty much what you get. As I have a daytime job, I only spend time in it a few hours in the morning and (sometimes) at night, and at weekends and on holidays. Basically it serves two functions: drop-in, sit-down and write, and keep track of the business side (which I'm much worse at than I am at the writing bit). Hence the cupboards and filing cabinets. Creative meditation takes place elsewhere in the house. The fourth wall behind the POV is a wall-to-ceiling inbuilt cupboard, with mirrors as doors. As I'd rather look at monsters than myself, these doors are covered in movie posters -- "Godzilla", "Them" and "Tarantula!" at the moment. In the inbuilt is... more stuff, mostly books. Off-screen on the right is a large sliding-door and window, but I rarely pull back the blinds as all it looks out upon is a fence and the side wall of the neighbour's house.

The visible shelving (in front and above the desk) is mainly a repository for reference books, but there's also piles of unsorted papers, graphic novels, notes, CDs and DVDs and books for review or other purposes (I recently organised the film festival stream of Conflux 4, so the residue of that is still in evidence). I only use a laptop in this room as all I do is write on it. Graphic work takes place in my uni office or in Cat's room (where there is a big desktop Mac). The statue of the skeletal warrior came from a bookshop in Leura. It and the gargoyle serve as silent sounding boards for ideas. The painting on the left is a Shaun Tan original of a cover for one of my children's books.

Also of note is the iPod, which has become a constant companion and is full of music that Cat hates (Hawkwind, Jethro Tull, etc.); but I tend to only listen to it when I'm doing business as I'm finding music too distracting to listen to while writing these days. The pile of crap on the right of the table top are notes on stories, print-outs of research material, manuscripts that need reading, issues of "Fortean Times" and unpaid bills. If the picture was higher resolution, you'd no doubt be able to see all the cat hair that gets left behind by visitors...

Robert Hood

Though best known for his horror stories, Robert Hood also writes fantasy, SF, crime and various other mutated forms. His books include Immaterial: Ghost Stories, Backstreets and the Shades series of supernatural thrillers. He writes film commentary and occasionally edits anthologies -- such as the award- winning Daikaiju! Giant Monster Tales, which he co-edited with Robin Pen, and its two follow-up volumes.

Corralling giant monsters, zombies, ghosts and madmen: that's why his room is such as mess!

http://www.roberthood.net
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Alisa Krasnostein





I had to have 2 photos to represent my creative and working space because I work by splitting my tasks across spaces. The bulk of ASif! is run and done from my study at this desk. It's usually covered in books, pamphlets, catalogues and slush as material waits to be unpacked, catalogued, assigned and posted back out again. There's a tiered magazine stand to the left that houses more review copies, mags and other items that are in slightly longer turnaround times. Behind my desk is my large (x3) bookcase overflowing with my book collection. But we're moving house soon and I hope to spread this working area across two rooms in the new place.

Anything that's not processing or sheer grunt work is done in my other work space. This is a snapshot but it's constantly morphing and doesn't look remotely like this even now. Most of my knitting, sewing, reading, reviewing and editing goes on here. It's usually a cluttered space filled with more stimuli and works in progress than I can handle. So many projects, so little time ...

Alisa Krasnostein

Alisa Krasnostein has a passion for voluntarily overcommitting herself to things. She is the Executive Editor of ASif, which launched in November 2005. In 2006 she launched the online webzine New Ceres and was Convenor of the Science Fiction panel for the Aurealis Awards. In 2007 she founded Twelfth Planet Press with Ben Payne and Tansy Rayner Roberts. Twelfth Planet Press projects include the new YA speculative fiction ezine Shiny and the anthology 2012 (to be released in 2008). Alisa is also a member of The Last Short Story Project, and won a Ditmar for Best New Talent in 2007.

http://girliejones.livejournal.com/
http://www.asif.dreamhosters.com/
http://shinymag.blogspot.com/
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Stephanie Gunn





My writing "room" consists of one fixed object - the laptop. I've always preferred writing fiction on a laptop rather than a desktop. I suspect a lot of that comes from the fact that I wrote a PhD thesis on a desktop. Arthritis makes it difficult for me to sit at a desk for hours on end, so the couch is a comfortable compromise.

Note also the ugg boots underneath the coffee table and the blanket - both essential in the cooler weather. On most days the laptop would also be joined by a mug of tea or bottle of water. Note also the (semi) optional cat, who is usually trying to get onto my lap (even though the laptop is already there) or smooching up and distracting me.

Not visible is the television and DVD shelves. I like to write to visuals as well as music sometimes - at the moment, writing is being accompanied by "The X Files" or "Battlestar Galactica".

I'll be moving to a larger home soon and am looking forward to setting up a more permanent writing area. Knowing me, the laptop will probably end up exactly where it is here again.

Stephanie Gunn

Stephanie Gunn has a PhD in genetics and immunology and therefore choose to write dark urban fantasy. She has had short stories published in the likes of Shadowed Realms and is currently at work on a novel, Thought and Memory. She also reviews for Horrorscope.

http://www.stephaniegunn.com/
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Lee and Lyn Battersby





It's probably inaccurate to call what you see merely 'our writing space'. If you look behind you, you'll find Lyn's easel, her sewing table, walls full of kid art, our craft storage racks, our business correspondence files, the shredder, the laminator.... it's a multi-purpose space that takes up most of the front third of the house. The bookcase to the left of the picture delineates the work area from a bookcase-encircled section we call our reading room, which contains a couch and shelf space for more awards and trinkets. The whole house is this bright, filled with colour, art, mementoes and memorabilia, reflecting both the ambience of our family life and the journey we've taken to be the people we are: our pasts are tumultuous, to say the least, and so we surround ourselves with signposts to happiness.

Overall, not much 'pure' writing gets done at these desks- Lyn will write wherever the mood takes her, as long as the space is clean and feels uncluttered. She's just as happy to take the laptop into the bedroom and spread out across the bed, where she can look out the window at our private garden and feel at her most comfortable; and I write where the will takes me; in notebooks, on scraps of paper, on trains and dinner tables.... I'm a pen and paper guy, more often than not, and often only come to the computer to input and print. But the idea of an office space is important to us both. It's a concrete area set aside for the pursuit of an important ideal, and when the blinds are open, and the light is streaming in, and we can see across the road to the public park with its profusion of grass trees and massive gums, it's a happy and relaxed place to create, which is good for our souls.

Lee and Lyn Battersby

Lee Battersby is the Aurealis, Ditmar, Australian Shadows and Writers of the Future winning author of over 50 stories, including appearances in Australia, the United States and Europe in magazines and anthologies such as Tales of The Unanticipated, Znak Sagite, All-Star Zeppelin Adventure Stories, Short Trips: Destination Prague and Daikaiju III: Giant Monsters vs The World. Many of his best stories have been collected in “Through Soft Air” (Prime Books, 2006). A tutor at the internationally regarded Clarion South workshops in 2007, he lives in Perth, Western Australia, with his wife, writer Lyn Battersby, 5 children, and an increasing number of bizarre objets d’art.

Lyn Battersby’s first publishing credit came in 2001 when her story “Divinities” was published in Antipodean SF (under the name Triffitt). “Learned Instincts” soon followed in ASIM 7, with “Cracking Up” not long after in Antipodean SF. Her real breakout came in 2005 when her story “The Memory of Breathing” appeared in ASIM 17. The story received multiple award nominations, including The Aurealis, and won a Tin Duck at Swancon 2006. The film rights were sold earlier this year and the feature-length script is currently under construction. Not content to sit back and enjoy her small success, she has since published “The Hanging Tree” (the first to appear with her new married name) in Borderlands 6 and “Edges” in Shadowed Realms 9. Most recently, she has appeared in Daikaiju!: Revenge of the Giant Monster Tales.

http://www.battersby.com.au
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Damien Kane





I see so much on my train ride home
In this diverse culture of ours.
From people who kiss and caress each other
To the ones who are silent for hours.
But do you look upon their faces
As they sit down near to you?
They look different and interesting
Like me, they're just passing through.

They are the personality of my novels
With their funny airs and graces,
The drinker's tattoo, the old hag's hair
The young girl with twisted braces.
How can I not love to write
With so many people to write about
They each have many stories:
I just ask and they come out.

For me, I love the silence
So I can write up my next story
About a blade, a man and a monster or two:
Yes. Something that has to be gory.
I use the people around me;
My characters are born from the train
I don't understand these people
And tomorrow, I'll see them again.

I love to write on the train:
It's my personal writing room.
I can write anything I desire:
From romance to impending doom.

Damien Kane

Damien Kane lives in Brisbane Australia with his wife and three kids, a dog, two budgies, four fish and two snails. He met his wife on the internet about 10 years ago when living in England. He currently suffers from chronic fatigue syndrome, sleeps a lot, and gets on the wife's nerves. He's written hundreds of short stories and poems and has around 12 novels in first draft and another four on the way.

http://www.damienkane.com
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
David Carroll





I have strategically positioned this shot so you can't see the disaster area on the floor -- though perhaps the fact we have bookcases back to back in the centre of the room gives some indication that I am overflowing. Likewise you can't see the Eddie Campbell From Hell cover, the latex swords or the dart board.

There is a placard on my monitor saying 'Creativity ... is Not a Pretty Sight' (but it broke).

David Carroll

David Carroll has co-written the novel Prismatic (under the name Edwina Grey) about plague and buried secrets, and the book All Tomorrow's Zombies about futuristic undead. Also stories, reviews and the occasional website. He is a committee member of the Australian Horror Writers Association.

http://www.tabula-rasa.info/DavidCarroll.html
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Trent Jamieson





This is my writing room/study. I started using an exercise ball instead of a chair about two years ago, and find it much more comfortable. I generally write about 1000 to 3000 words a day, staring up at that wall, and it stares back. It's all very serious, the only thing that winks is my slowly dying laptop and, as far as I'm concerned, there's a hell of a lot of pathos in that winking. There are three whiteboards on the wall, on which I always intend to write notes, but rarely do. This room also contains four more bookshelves, a big comfy black leather chair, an old travelling chest, a cat and an opium pipe – the latter of which I would use, if I smoked opium, the cat, of course, does and is even now riding the dragon, I just wish he wouldn't wear my red velvet smoking jacket.

Trent Jamieson

SF writer and Silent Motion Picture Actor, Trent Jamieson should be 106 years old, but is only 34 on account of TEMPORAL RADIATION. He lives in Brisbane with his wife, Diana, and won the 2005 Aurealis Award for Best Science Fiction Short Story. He is currently working on a novel called "Roil". His short story collection, Reserved for Travelling Shows, is available from Prime Books.

http://trentonomicon.blogspot.com/
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Kirstyn McDermott





Here's my writing space ... one half of the spare bedroom. It's a tiny room, which is the reason you can really only see my desk in the photo; there simply wasn't anymore space to step back and get a larger view, unless I started knocking down walls. Hmmm. Actually, I like the small space and the fact the room is also quite dim doesn't bother me, as I usually write at night. What you can't see is a bed on the opposite wall, which comes in handy when I'm up really late with the writing, and next to that a bookshelf filled to overflowing.

The black lump on the filing cabinet is an old Royal typewriter rescued from an op shop back in Newcastle where I grew up. About fifteen years later and it's still waiting for refurbishment. (Sorry, typewriter.) Sitting on the desk - apart from my very old, very dear writing-only laptop - are some bits and pieces that I've managed to accumulate: a black Bastet statue, a small pewter Pegasus, a cute little redback spider on a rock, a chunk of obsidian, a plastic Alien action figure, a plush meercat toy, a really crappy old crow/raven/pigeon bird-thing (really crappy), and a few more. All special to me, for various reasons. There are also a couple of favourite Gary Larson cartoons (the one about primitive man seeing a bird, wishing he could fly, finding out he can't, then building a bow and arrow and killing the bird; and the one about nervous little dogs preparing for their day with coffee; both strike a cord with me.)

Oh, and the things hanging from the filing cabinet are two very dead, very flat ferrets. The sort that would have been made into fancy clothing accessories back before we all got so enlightened. They still have their back feet and tails attached and beady little fakes eyes have been stitched into their furry little heads. I rescued them from eBay years ago and they've been hanging on that cabinet ever since. Don't ask me why. Really, don't.

Kirstyn McDermott

Kirstyn McDermott was born on Halloween, an auspicious date which perhaps accounts for her lifelong attraction to all things dark, mysterious and bumpy-in-the-night-ish. She has been published in various magazines and anthologies, including Shadowed Realms, Redsine, Southern Blood and Island. Her short fiction has been nominated for two Ditmar Awards, and has received an Aurealis Award Honourable Mention and three Honourable Mentions in Datlow & Windling's Year’s Best Fantasy & Horror. Kirstyn lives in Melbourne, and is a member of the SuperNOVA writers group. When not discovering new and ever more pressing ways in which to procrastinate, she is currently working on a novel-length manuscript.
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Stephen Dedman



Because of the shape of my study, it's difficult to capture all of it with one photo even on wide-angle: door in one corner, desk in another, the other end of the room dominated by bookshelves. The picture of the floor is probably the most representative of my organisational skills.

The desk is relatively new: my old desk had survived nearly 40 years before being damaged in the last move. Most of the surface is dominated by the laptop and peripherals - and, of course, a very large mug of tea and a dinosaur tooth. Two drawers contain printer paper, envelopes, and other stationery for the odd occasion when I need to send off a hardcopy; the other is filled with old photos, fossils too small for the shelves, old letters, and other mementos. Most of the books in this room are non-fiction, yet to be sorted into any system; the shelves are also a home to action figures of some of my literary heroes (Shakespeare, Poe, Wilde, and a dodo standing in for Lewis Carroll), as well as other influences on my writing.

Stephen Dedman

Stephen Dedman says: I’m a writer: author of four novels, a non-fiction book and more than 100 short stories, plus reviews, role-playing games, stageplays, essays and editorials. Most of the fiction I’ve written has been speculative, fantastic, or just plain weird, but I’ve also written thrillers, erotica, and westerns. Sometimes all at the same time.

http://www.stephendedman.com
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)
So, as the last post shows, I've started doing the Creative Space posts. A week late, but hey, I needed the time to gather them up a bit. Still pretty thin on the ground, but maybe more will come along as time goes on?

One thing I didn't realise is that the ABC's Articulate reported on this a while back, which makes my tardiness much more public than usual. So, if anyone's come here from there, I apologise profusely for the week's delay, and I hope the results are worth the wait! There'll be a new post every weekday until I run out, which at this rate will be in the middle of next week, unless some new submissions come across my desk. Please send photos (approximately 800x600, though I can resize easily enough!) to:

myroom@martinlivings.com

Thanks, and enjoy!
martinlivings: (Creative Spaces)

Creative Space
Sean Williams





The picture is in soft focus, which is how I mostly see the space while I'm working in it--through peripheral vision. The desk used to belong to my grandfather, Harry Schiller, who always wanted to be a writer but ended up being a farmer instead (and discovered the massive Cowell Jade Province in South Australia, but that's another story). Above my monitor is a stunning work by Art Vanderbyl that's been in my family ever since it was painted in 1976. The wooden desk and the painting's muted tones balance the harsh, high-tech light I work under every day, and gives my study a warm ambience--or so it feels to me, anyway. The room is dark, but it's actually brighter than I would normally keep it. I like to mushroom all day with the stereo (positioned directly behind the chair) burbling innocuously away in the background, no matter what the weather is like outside.

I doubt there's much here that isn't in most other writers' studies: the dictionaries and other reference works within easy reach; the photos of family and loved ones; the disorderly pile of books waiting to be read; bragshelf and awards to the very right of the picture; even a token dumbbell or two, indicating an awareness of one's sedentary lifestyle, even if that doesn't extend to actually exercising very often. But there are unique details: the sonic screwdriver Danny Oz sent me a couple of years ago; a beautiful green box I've kept from the wedding present Deb Biancotti gave Amanda and I earlier this year; a wooden "drum" given to me by the Writers on the Edge writing group in thanks for taking a retreat with them in 2005; the carved wooden lizard given to my father when he was working for with communities in the North Territory when we lived up there in the 1970s. Touches like these -- along with the desk, the painting, and others you can't see -- make the space mine, and make the words written here all that more
special to me.

Sean Williams

Sean Williams is the author of over sixty published short stories and twenty-two novels, including the Books of the Cataclysm and The Resurrected Man. His work has been published around the world in numerous languages, on-line, and in spoken word editions. His current projects include Astropolis, a gothic-noir gender-bending space opera trilogy, and The Broken Land, a dark fantasy series for children. He is also writing the novelisation of the forthcoming Star Wars computer game, The Force Unleashed.

http://www.seanwilliams.com

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Martin Livings

December 2009

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